Partipost’s biz dev manager shares 5 tips on how to write a business proposal that will win client confidence

If you’re a business owner, you’ll know that one of the most crucial skills you need to have is the ability to craft persuasive and unique business proposals. Many business owners attempt writing effective business proposals for potential clients only to suffer from rejection. Well, strength in numbers doesn’t seem to be the accurate solution when it comes to rallying client confidence. Rather, the art of writing a effective business proposals is key to gaining better clientele. But do you know how to write a business proposal that will win clients over?

One such brand that’s been extremely effective in garnering client confidence with their kick-ass proposals is Partipost, a crowd marketing platform known for helping brands advertise productively. With over 100 clients and headquarters in Taiwan, Indonesia and Malaysia and Philippines in the near future, Partipost is proof that stellar business proposals are a huge contributing factor in boosting your clientele. We’ve reached out to Tu Linh, Partipost’s awesome business development manager, to spill some secrets on how they’ve managed to garner client confidence and trust through their business proposals.

What are business proposals?

Basically, business proposals are a handy tool to forge long-lasting relationships with clients. Sounds easy, but promoting your business while keeping details clear and honest isn’t always a breeze.

No two proposals are the same. A proposal showcases your company, brand, reputation and expertise. Do you really want to be remembered as a boring, one page Word Document? Business proposals are a chance to wow your potential clients and inject your brand’s personality into the work you do. A good business proposal will show the client that you value their what they do, enough to construct a proposal tailored specifically to their needs.

5 tips on how to write a business proposal that’s strong AF

how to write a business proposal

Do your research

When a new potential client comes along, you might be feeling the pressure to rush out a business proposal as fast as possible to catch that chance. While your urgency is key, sloppy proposals will be your downfall. Thus, patience is the first step on how to write a business proposal.

Taking time to research about your client and understand their products will give you a clearer picture of which aspects to target in your proposal. Tu Linh shares that she usually look at the difficulties a company faces and how Partipost can aid them in that department in terms of expanding their use of social media marketing. If you don’t understand the client’s problem, it’ll be mighty hard to come out with adequate solutions.

‘Many of our clients are constantly looking for new innovative ways to advertise organically, at Partipost we like to look at a client’s overarching strategy and position accordingly for each unique industry. It helps that we have numerous clients in each, including tech and startups, alcoholic brands, FMCG and supermarket goods. This means we have a clearer understanding of the specific needs of each industry,’ says Tu Linh.

Have the client’s needs in mind

This is number one on Tu Linh’s list! She states that ‘As a business solution provider, we have to showcase how we can best help the client achieve their marketing objective. Presenting the clients with relevant case studies of marketing campaigns we have successfully executed in the past from such clients as Nivea, Singtel, Tiger Beer, Grab and DBS. Not only will this allow clients to have a better understanding of what we do, but also assure them that we are professionals in the field who can deliver results.’

As mentioned before, no two business proposals should be the same. When it comes to truly writing an effective business proposal, one key thing is understand the client’s needs and wants. What are your client’s goals for the project, who are their target audiences? These are a couple of points that you’ll have to keep in mind while crafting your business pitch. Tailoring each strategy and proposal to fit the brand story and style of your client is more likely to persuade them in taking up your offer.

Look ahead, plan ahead, as you learn how to write a business proposal

We all know the saying: if you fail to plan, you plan to fail. When it comes to writing the best proposals, most might wonder if it’s better to start off with a strong template and fit details in, or to gather content before writing from scratch. To Tu Linh, both are equally important:

Reflecting on the client’s brand and needs allows me to curate a marketing campaign specifically to the unique needs of each client. A template will ensure that I cover all grounds and do not miss out on any important aspects of a proposal. Both of these are crucial in my thought process and creation of a proposal and sales pitch for the client.’

Be wholly transparent

how to write a business proposal

 

If you want to forge long-lasting relationships with your clients, trust is one aspect you cannot do without. You’d want your client to trust that you know your stuff, and are able to provide them the results they desperately need. This could range from statistics and numbers, to past results from similar clients. In addition, giving your clients a rough guideline and the steps you’re going to take throughout the project can help lay the foundation of your partnership. These key pieces of advice will prepare you on how to write a business proposal that rocks.

‘Highlighting all the fields and numbers discussed showcases our transparency as a company, establishing a high level of confidence and trust between us and the clients. At the end of the day, our creed is that actions speak louder than words,’ says Tu Linh.

Transparency is essential in building not only relationships with clients, but also for your brand’s reputation. After all, a great job done could open other doors. Tu Linh highlights that Partipost’s ‘goal is to always try our best to execute and deliver more than what is expected of us. After all the best outcome for us if when clients are truly pleased with what we deliver, so that we can build long term meaningful relationships with our clients.’

Make your proposal stand out from the rest  

how to write a business proposal

Marketing managers receive tons of business proposals every day. You wouldn’t want your proposal to be just another sheet in the stack. One common mistake that most business proposals make is chucking loads of information into their proposals. While showing a good grasp of the client’s needs and wants is excellent, too much can make your proposal dreadful to read. Here’s Tu Linh’s tip on how to make your proposal easily digestible:

‘I like to keep my proposal to the make my points succinct and straight to the point. Sometimes, I even deliver information in a table format if I think that is palatable way for our clients to digest the information.’

In addition, Tu Linh also agrees that marketing managers don’t have the luxury of time to read deeply into your proposals. ‘Being able to go through a proposal quickly while understanding the essence of it will be more efficient for our clients. Also, having all the numbers and mechanics laid out clearly will make it much easier for clients to process information and decide whether it fits their current needs and objectives.’

Learn how to write a business proposal and put a ring on your long lasting corporate relationship

If you want it, you’re gonna have to chase it. Writing effective business proposals isn’t a skill anyone is born with. It’ll take lots of practice and tries to get it right. But always keep in mind the needs of your potential client, as well as their target audience. After all, we’re gunning for the best ways to entice and to connect with potential consumers. But now you know how to write a business proposal that rocks… So go forth, budding business proposal writer, and spread your wings!

Link to Glints Singapore website

 

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